Aviation Schools  

Aviation Schools


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an aviation school sign advertising flying lessons Pilots learn to fly through military flight training, FAA parts 141 and 61 schools, and independent flight instructors.  Part 141 schools use a structured curriculum ideal for students pursuing a flying career, while part 61 schools are less structured and require more flight hours.

Training is facilitated through classroom and hands-on instruction provided by a flight instructor.  A student pilot's license can be completed after the age of 16 and allows for solo flying within a limited range of the home airport.  A private pilot's license allows for night flying and transporting passengers but no commercial activity, and applicants must be at least 17 years old.  A recreational pilot's license is available for light, slow aircraft.  Tailwheel, high performance, and complex aircraft require a logbook sign-off from an instructor.  Ratings include instrument, multi-engine, commercial, and airline transport pilot.  Categories of aircraft include fixed-wing, glider, rotor-wing (helicopter), blimp, and hot air balloon.  FAA examiners administer knowledge and practical tests which cover flight safety, planning, aircraft control during certain maneuvers, and air traffic control communication.  For more information about becoming an aircraft pilot, visit the Federal Aviation Administration's pilot training web page.

Although flying used to be a pipe dream for many, the number of available aviation schools currently in operation means the dream of flying can become a reality for those looking to take to the air, both professionally and recreationally!

Aviation Schools in each State and Washington, DC

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About Aviation Schools